Scholarship on Gender In Political Science

 

Recently:

Check out the most recent scholarly article on issues of gender in the Political Science Profession!

Hidalgo et al. 2018:

Hidalgo, Daniel F., Suzanna Linn, Margaret Roberts, Betsy Sinclair, and Rocío Titiunik, “Report on Diversity and Inclusion in the Society for Political Methodology,” Jan 29, 2018, link here.

Conclusion and Findings:

“Diversity must be understood in broad terms. Women and African-Americans are underrepresented in our Society, but students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds and small universities are also underrepresented. Our Society should not lose sight of the many dimensions of diversity. Second, we must make our diversity efforts public and salient and avoid scheduling diversity events outside of the prime time of the SPM Annual Meeting. We believe it would send a powerful message to all SPM members to make the annual SPM meeting the place where diversity and inclusion issues are addressed and discussed, and the setting where a diverse group of scholars is encouraged to present their work.Instead of having an annual meeting that lacks diversity and then many remedial programs and events occurring at other places and times, we suggest moving most diversity events to the mainstream conference—not on Wednesday night, not in April, but rather between Thursday and Saturday during the annual Polmeth meeting, at prime time. Over time, we believe this will contribute to make the entire Society a more diverse and inclusive community. Finally, we believe that all diversity policies should have a single, integrated society as their final goal. We recommend against any policies that cement segregated professional networks between men and women, between non-Hispanic whites and racial/ethnic minorities, or between high-ranking departments and lower-ranking departments.

 

Scholarship:

Click on any article to navigate to its full-length PDF version!

American Political Science Association. 2004. Women’s Advancement in Political Science. Report on APSA Workshop on Advancement of Women in Academic Political Science in the United States. March.

American Political Science Association. 2011. Political Science in the 21st Century. Report of the Task Force on Political Science in the 21st Century. October.

Anonymous and Anonymous. 1999. “Tenure in a Chilly Climate.” PS: Political Science and Politics 32 (1): 91-99.

Blau, Francine D., Janet M. Currie, Rachel T.A. Croson, and Donna K. Ginther. 2010. “Can Mentoring Help Female Assistant Professors? Interim Results from a Randomized Trial.” Working Paper 15707. National Bureau of Economic Research.

Bos, Angela L. and Monica C Schneider. 2012 “New Research on Gender in Political Psychology: Mentoring to Fix the Leaky Pipeline,” PS: Political Science and Politics 45: 223-231.

Breuning, Marijke and Kate Sanders. 2007. “Gender and Journal Authorship in Eight Prestigious Political Science Journals.” PS: Political Science and Politics. 40 (April): 347-351.

Cassese, Erin C., Angela L. Bos, Lauren E. Duncan. 2012. “Integrating Gender into the Political Science Core Curriculum,” PS: Political Science and Politics 45: 238-243.

CEOSE (Committee on Equal Opportunities in Science and Engineering), NSF. 2004. Broadening Participation in America’s Science and Engineering Workforce: The 1994-2003 Decennial and 2004 Biennial Reports to Congress. Washington, DC.

Claypool, Vicki Hesli, Brian David Janssen, Dongkyu Kim, and Sara McLaughlin Mitchell, “ Determinants of Salary Dispersion among Political Science Faculty: The Differential Effects of Where You Work (Institutional Characteristics) and What You Do (Negotiate and Publish),” PS: Political Science & Politics 50 (1): 146-156 (2017)

Ginther, Donna. 2004. “Gender Differences in Salary and Promotion in Political Science.” Paper presented at the APSA Workshop on Women’s Advancement in Political Science, Washington, DC, March 5.

Hesli, Vicki, and Barbara Burrell. 1995. “Faculty Rank among Political Scientists and Reports on the Academic Environment: The Differential Impact of Gender on Observed Patterns.” PS: Political Science and Politics 28 (1): 101–111.

Hesli, Vicki, Evelyn C. Fink, and Diane Duffy. 2003a. “Mentoring in a Positive Graduate Student Experience: Survey Results from the Midwest Region, Part I.” PS: Political Science and Politics 36 (3): 457-460.

Hesli, Vicki, Evelyn C. Fink, and Diane Duffy. 2003b. “The Role of Faculty in Creating a Positive Graduate Student Experience: Survey from the Midwest Region, Part II.” PS: Political Science and Politics 36 (4): 801-804.

Hesli, Vicki L., and Jae Mook Lee. 2013. “Job Satisfaction in Academia: Why Are Some Faculty Members Happier Than Others?” PS: Political Science and Politics 46 (2): 339-354.

Hesli, Vicki L., and Sara M. Mitchell. 2013. “Women Don’t Ask? Women Don’t Say No? Bargaining and Service in the Political Science Profession” PS: Political Science and Politics 46 (2): 355-369.

Hidalgo, Daniel F., Suzanna Linn, Margaret Roberts, Betsy Sinclair, and Rocío Titiunik, “Report on Diversity and Inclusion in the Society for Political Methodology,” Jan 29, 2018.

Leggon, Cheryl B. 2006. “Women in Science: Racial and Ethnic Differences and the Differences They Make.” Journal of Technology Transfer 31 (3): 325-333.

Mathews, A. Lanethea and Kristi Andersen. 2001. “A Gender Gap in Publishing? Women’s Representation in Edited Political Science Books.” PS: Political Science and Politics 43 (1): 143-147.

Monforti, Jessica Lavariega and Melissa R. Michelson. 2008. “Diagnosing the Leaky Pipeline: Continuing Barriers to the Retention of Latinas and Latinos in Political Science.” PS: Political Science and Politics. 41 (1): 161-166.

Monroe, Kristen Renwick. 2002. ”Cracking the Glass Ceiling – Keeping it Broken.” Political Science & Politics 35 (2): 237-242.

Monroe, Kristen, Saba Ozyurt, Ted Wrigley, and Amy Alexander. 2008. “Gender Equality in Academia: Bad News from the Trenches, and Some Possible Solutions.” Perspectives on Politics 6 (2): 215-233.

Sarkees, Meredith Reid and Nancy McGlen. 1999. “Misdirected Backlash: The Evolving Nature of Academia and the Status of Women in Political Science.” PS: Political Science and Politics 32 (1): 100-108.

Shames, Shauna Lani. 2010. “Women’s Leadership in Political Science.” In Karen O’Connor, ed., Gender and Women’s Leadership: A Reference Handbook. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 669-678.

Smooth, Wendy G. 2013. “Intersectionality and Women’s Advancement in the Discipline and Across the Academy.” Article manuscript written as part of a symposium proposal co-edited by Carol Mershon and Denise Walsh, under preparation for submission to a refereed journal.

Van Assendelft, Laura et al. 2003. “Political Science in a Difference Voice: Women Faculty Perspectives on the Status of Women in Political Science Departments in the South.” PS: Political Science and Politics 36 (2): 311-315.

Williams, Joan C., Tamina Alon, and Stephanie Bornstein. 2006. “Beyond the ‘Chilly Climate’: Eliminating Bias Against Women and Fathers in Academe.” The NEA Higher Education Journal: 79-96.

Wolfinger, Nicholas H., Mary Ann Mason, and Marc Goulden. 2008. “Problems in the Pipeline: Gender, Marriage, and Fertility in the Ivory Tower.” The Journal of Higher Education 79 (4): 388-405.

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*With thanks to Carol Mershon and Denise Walsh, whose “Women in Political Science and Women in Politics” (2015) formed the original basis for this document. See Bibliography.