ITALIAN DEMOCRACY AND ITS DISCONTENTS – Congrips 2018 APSA Call for papers –

114th APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition – Boston, August 30 – September 2, 2018

 

The CONGRIPS 2018 APSA Panel has adopted the APSA Conference Theme Statement, ‘Democracy and its Discontents’ for the Italian case. Italian democracy has been undergoing significant economic, social and political challenges in the past twenty years and especially in the past decade following the eruption of the economic crisis of 2008. This has a brought a variety of challenges to existing political parties, actors and institutions, and the emergence of new political forces which are challenging the status quo and traditional politics. There appears to be a deep-seated and continuing dissatisfaction on the part of the public with Italian politics, the party system and broader political system, as reflected in rising support for anti-establishment parties and increasing skepticism towards the European Union and reforms proposed by the existing political class. Italian politics, in short, seems to have become characterized chiefly by its discontents. CONGRIPS welcomes paper proposals on any aspects of these discontents: on the origins, nature and the impact of social, economic and political ideas, movements, parties, policies which contest established practices, parties and politics in Italy. The aim is bringing together a set of papers which together convey the richness and complexity of the politics of discontent in Italy today, which itself is a reflection of broader trends in Europe and beyond. Applications should be submitted via the APSA process.

The size and shape of the Italian interest system between the 1980s and the present day

The size and shape of the Italian interest system between the 1980s and the present day

Renata Lizzi and Andrea Pritoni

Italian Political Science Review / Rivista Italiana di Scienza Politica 

Volume 47, Issue 3, November 2017, pp. 291-312

Continue reading “The size and shape of the Italian interest system between the 1980s and the present day”

Believing in Conspiracy Theories: Evidence from an Exploratory Analysis of Italian Survey Data

Believing in Conspiracy Theories: Evidence from an Exploratory Analysis of Italian Survey Data

Moreno Mancosu, Salvatore Vassallo & Cristiano Vezzoni

South European Society and Politics (Latest articles)

Continue reading “Believing in Conspiracy Theories: Evidence from an Exploratory Analysis of Italian Survey Data”

Personalization of politics between television and the internet: leader effects in the 2013 Italian parliamentary election

Personalization of politics between television and the internet: leader effects in the 2013 Italian parliamentary election

Diego Garzia

Journal of Information Technology & Politics  (Latest Articles)

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Congrips Panel and Business Meeting at APSA Annual Conference 2017, San Francisco

The CONGRIPS panel at APSA 2017 focuses on “Italian Politics after a Decade of Economic Recession”.  It will take place on Saturday, September 2, 14:00 to 15:30 (Westin St. Francis, Hampton).

2017 will mark nearly a decade since the unleashing of the biggest economic crisis the western world has experienced since the 1930s. No country has been immune from this crisis, and Italy in particular has found itself, for lengthy periods, at the forefront of one important regional reflection of that worldwide recession, the Eurozone crisis. Unlike the previous decade, since 2008 the economic recession has provided not just an essential backdrop or context to the changes that have occurred in the Italian polity but the prime motivating factor. The economic downturn in 2008 brought to the fore – although not immediately – the deep-rooted structural problems in the Italian polity and exposed them in a dramatic manner, visibly placing a country which had long aspired to be seen alongside its more modern northern counterparts as clearly part of ‘southern’ Europe. The impact on Italian politics and the political economy, the challenges to the legitimacy of the established political parties and elites as well as the responses of those elites, has been nothing short of dramatic. Nearly a decade on, it is clear that the crisis has left a lasting impact on the Italian polity, despite the persistence of many features. This panel hosts papers by Italian specialists who analyse different aspects of the Italian polity (politics, policy, society, transition) in this decade of economic recession, assessing and explaining the degree of change that has been experienced, as well as future likely directions.

The panel will comprise four papers by: Adele Lebano (University of Edinburgh); Laura Polverari (University of Strathclyde); Manuela Caiani (SNS Florence) and Paolo R. Graziano (University of Padua); and Martin Bull (University of Salford). More details can be found here.

The Business Meeting will take place on Friday, 1 September, 18:30-19:30 (Hilton Union Square, Executive Conf. Ctr. Seacliff Room).

All welcome. The agenda will comprise: Membership, budget and Executive Committee update; 2018 Call for papers; Expansion of base, collaboration with other societies; IPSR news; Website and social media; New President’s statement; AOB.

 

THE EUROPEAN PILLAR OF SOCIAL RIGHTS: WHITE OR TOOTHLESS TIGER? by Laura Polverari

European Policies Research Centre School of Government & Public Policy
University of Strathclyde.
Picture by John Young © www.youngmedia.co.uk 2016
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

A new blog  by our President, Dr Laura Polverari, examines the content and promise of the new European Pillar of Social Rights. It argues that, while there are no doubts that the Pillar represents an important opportunity for the strengthening of Social Rights in Europe and that it should be seen in itself as an achievement, there is also a need for a debate on the scope for more significant, systemic and territorialised EU investments in this area, and that the ongoing debates on the post-2020 MFF and Cohesion policy represent an opportunity for such debate. The full text of the blog can be accessed from this link: http://www.cohesify.eu/2017/06/22/european-social-pillar/.